LARGEST GOLD COMPANY - GOLD COMPANY


LARGEST GOLD COMPANY - WALLACE GOLD FLATWARE.



Largest Gold Company





largest gold company






    company
  • Accompany (someone)

  • small military unit; usually two or three platoons

  • Associate with; keep company with

  • an institution created to conduct business; "he only invests in large well-established companies"; "he started the company in his garage"

  • be a companion to somebody





    gold
  • A yellow precious metal, the chemical element of atomic number 79, valued esp. for use in jewelry and decoration, and to guarantee the value of currencies

  • A deep lustrous yellow or yellow-brown color

  • coins made of gold

  • amber: a deep yellow color; "an amber light illuminated the room"; "he admired the gold of her hair"

  • made from or covered with gold; "gold coins"; "the gold dome of the Capitol"; "the golden calf"; "gilded icons"

  • An alloy of this











American Telephone & Telegraph Company Building




American Telephone & Telegraph Company Building





Financial District, Lower Manhattan

The American Telephone & Telegraph Company Building, designed by noted architect William Welles Bosworth and constructed in three phases from 1912 to 1922, is an important example of Greek-inspired neo-Classical design. Envisioned by company president Theodore Newton Vail as a grand corporate symbol, the building was designed to create an impression of quality, durability, and permanence expressive of the Telephone Company’s commitment to public service.

Its architect, Welles Bosworth, was a prominent designer of classical buildings and a leading preservation architect and this, his only large-scale office building, is considered one of his finest works. Inspired by Greek and Roman precedents, the facades of the American Telephone and Telegraph Building are clad in Vermont granite and incorporate nine superimposed colonnades, with eight three-story high Ionic colonnades based on the order of the then recently excavated Temple of Sardis stacked on a double-height base of colossal columns copied from the Doric order of the Athenian Parthenon.

The impression of solidity is enhanced by the use of stone spandrel panels at the base of each story grouping which contrast with bronze spandrels and window frames in the upper two-thirds of the bays. The spacing of the bays on Dey Street and certain other features of the design reflect the theories of Professor William H. Goodyear regarding Greek architectural practice and were intended to create a sense of “rhythmic beauty.” The facades are beautifully detailed with Greek-inspired ornament, including swags, and wreaths, lion heads, frets, paterae, anthemia, and delicate foliate reliefs.

The concern for classical detailing also extended to the articulation of the subway stair enclosures on Dey and Fulton Streets and to the southbound platform of the Fulton Street IRT subway where the A level basement Broadway facade of the 1912-16 portion of the building was faced with granite and given special bronze gates and shop windows enriched with classical motifs.

The western end of the building which contained the company’s executive offices is surmounted by a small Ionic temple with a stepped roof modeled on the mausoleum of Halicarnasus and is capped by a golden orb which originally supported a gilded bronze figure of The Genius of Electricity. From 1916 until 1983, this building was the headquarters of the American Telephone and Telegraph Company, the largest corporation in the world for much of the twentieth century. It remains in use as an office building.

The American Telephone and Telegraph Company Building is located on an irregular lot that extends approximately 154 feet along Broadway, 275 feet along Dey Street, and 200 feet along Fulton Street. The major portion of the building is twenty-six stories high (the double-height lobby space counting as two stories) and is surmounted by a twenty-seventh attic story housing mechanical equipment that was installed in 1959-61. The northwest corner of the building at 170 Dey Street rises to twenty-nine stories and is treated as a tower. The building has five basement stories. The southern portion of the Broadway facade of the A level basement story fronts onto the southbound platform of the Fulton Street IRT subway and is also included in this exterior designation.

The three major facades and the tower are clad in white Vermont granite. Except for the tower wing on Fulton Street, the facades are articulated with nine superimposed orders consisting of a double-height base of colossal Doric columns surmounted by eight three-story high Ionic colonnades. The tower is articulated with a tripartite design incorporating a three story base, twenty-three-story shaft, and three-story crown capped by a stepped pyramid. The southern portion of the west wall of the Fulton Street wing and the northern rear wall of the Dey Street wing, both visible from Fulton Street, and the small sliver of Dey Street wing’s western wall visible from Church Street are clad with light colored brick. The major facades retain their original bronze entrance and first-story window enframements, although a few windows have been altered to create display windows and some entries have been adapted for wheelchair access. (The windows and doors vary in configuration from facade to facade and are described below). All of the bronze metalwork has been painted gold and the inset nickel relief panels are painted silver. A large portion of the bronze grilles that were employed at the base of the building have been removed. These were originally fixed in front of the window glass on both the bottom and upper tier of windows and were employed for the paired sliding doors that were pushed into pockets behind the lower tier of sidelights during the day and pulled shut at night to protect the rotating door entries. When the 1920s addition was constructed and the main entrance to the building was moved from Dey St











American Telephone & Telegraph Company Building




American Telephone & Telegraph Company Building





Financial District, Downtown Manhattan, New York City, United States of America

The American Telephone & Telegraph Company Building, designed by noted architect William Welles Bosworth and constructed in three phases from 1912 to 1922, is an important example of Greek-inspired neo-Classical design. Envisioned by company president Theodore Newton Vail as a grand corporate symbol, the building was designed to create an impression of quality, durability, and permanence expressive of the Telephone Company’s commitment to public service.

Its architect, Welles Bosworth, was a prominent designer of classical buildings and a leading preservation architect and this, his only large-scale office building, is considered one of his finest works. Inspired by Greek and Roman precedents, the facades of the American Telephone and Telegraph Building are clad in Vermont granite and incorporate nine superimposed colonnades, with eight three-story high Ionic colonnades based on the order of the then recently excavated Temple of Sardis stacked on a double-height base of colossal columns copied from the Doric order of the Athenian Parthenon.

The impression of solidity is enhanced by the use of stone spandrel panels at the base of each story grouping which contrast with bronze spandrels and window frames in the upper two-thirds of the bays. The spacing of the bays on Dey Street and certain other features of the design reflect the theories of Professor William H. Goodyear regarding Greek architectural practice and were intended to create a sense of “rhythmic beauty.” The facades are beautifully detailed with Greek-inspired ornament, including swags, and wreaths, lion heads, frets, paterae, anthemia, and delicate foliate reliefs.

The concern for classical detailing also extended to the articulation of the subway stair enclosures on Dey and Fulton Streets and to the southbound platform of the Fulton Street IRT subway where the A level basement Broadway facade of the 1912-16 portion of the building was faced with granite and given special bronze gates and shop windows enriched with classical motifs.

The western end of the building which contained the company’s executive offices is surmounted by a small Ionic temple with a stepped roof modeled on the mausoleum of Halicarnasus and is capped by a golden orb which originally supported a gilded bronze figure of The Genius of Electricity. From 1916 until 1983, this building was the headquarters of the American Telephone and Telegraph Company, the largest corporation in the world for much of the twentieth century. It remains in use as an office building.

The American Telephone and Telegraph Company Building is located on an irregular lot that extends approximately 154 feet along Broadway, 275 feet along Dey Street, and 200 feet along Fulton Street. The major portion of the building is twenty-six stories high (the double-height lobby space counting as two stories) and is surmounted by a twenty-seventh attic story housing mechanical equipment that was installed in 1959-61. The northwest corner of the building at 170 Dey Street rises to twenty-nine stories and is treated as a tower. The building has five basement stories. The southern portion of the Broadway facade of the A level basement story fronts onto the southbound platform of the Fulton Street IRT subway and is also included in this exterior designation.

The three major facades and the tower are clad in white Vermont granite. Except for the tower wing on Fulton Street, the facades are articulated with nine superimposed orders consisting of a double-height base of colossal Doric columns surmounted by eight three-story high Ionic colonnades. The tower is articulated with a tripartite design incorporating a three story base, twenty-three-story shaft, and three-story crown capped by a stepped pyramid. The southern portion of the west wall of the Fulton Street wing and the northern rear wall of the Dey Street wing, both visible from Fulton Street, and the small sliver of Dey Street wing’s western wall visible from Church Street are clad with light colored brick. The major facades retain their original bronze entrance and first-story window enframements, although a few windows have been altered to create display windows and some entries have been adapted for wheelchair access. (The windows and doors vary in configuration from facade to facade and are described below). All of the bronze metalwork has been painted gold and the inset nickel relief panels are painted silver. A large portion of the bronze grilles that were employed at the base of the building have been removed. These were originally fixed in front of the window glass on both the bottom and upper tier of windows and were employed for the paired sliding doors that were pushed into pockets behind the lower tier of sidelights during the day and pulled shut at night to protect the rotating door entries. When the 1920s addition was constructed and the main en









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